Athens

Creepy Doll

Sunday, September 29, 2013

The group works out their agenda over breakfast. John has made an appointment to talk to Traveler Wood around lunch to ask him about fetches. In the meantime, he’d like to go to church and figures they can hit the Catholic school attached to the church to see if they can find record of Jamie. The church visit goes poorly. John is uncomfortable inside and finds the sound of the church bells to be physically painful. On the way out, he discovers that holy water burns him. Being Sunday, the school is closed.

Since they still have time before lunch, Jack suggests visiting Ichabod Young to see if they can secure a weapon for him. Young turns out to be a weird conspiracy theorist paranoid gun nut. He also doesn’t deal in cash, demanding they steal a doll from the historical society in payment for Jack’s sword. They are non-committal but, once outside, decide to check it out after the meeting with Wood. Sadly Wood doesn’t have much to offer. Fetches are too variable (and more so of late). He does offer the group jobs at the changeling newspaper he runs.

They case the historical society and find the doll. Jack determines that it is the focus of a haunting and so they decide to steal it, so he can try and communicate with the spirit within. After hours, John lets himself in, turns off the alarms and cameras, and puts the doll into a sack full of salt (as suggested by Jack). They return to the motel and attempts to talk to the ghost are mixed. It ends up possessing Jamie, but Jack exorcises it with his fist. In the end, all they are able to determine is that the ghosts is named Abigail and was the child of one of the town founders. They stick her in a drawer full of salt and agree to follow up tomorrow, when the library is open.

Jamie opts to stay and keep an eye on the doll while Jack and John go out clubbing. They end up at Verdant, which they learn is run by the Spring Queen. John ends up going home with a girl but doesn’t stay long. Jack returns to his room with Jamie.

Comments

AutumnBerg AutumnBerg

I'm sorry, but we no longer support this web browser. Please upgrade your browser or install Chrome or Firefox to enjoy the full functionality of this site.